A summary of Sonnet in William Shakespeare's Shakespeare's Sonnets. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Shakespeare's . Sonnet is like a love poem turned on its head. Usually, if you were talking about your beloved, you would go out of your way to praise her, to point all the. Sonnet is an anomaly. Shakespeare breaks with convention and creates a parody of tired Petrarchan ideals. His lover has wires for hairs.

My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red; If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red than her lips' red: If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires, black wires. Shakespeare's sonnet - My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun - with analysis and paraphrase.

This is a Shakespearean sonnet, which means that it follows the rhyme scheme ABABCDCDEFEFGG. The final rhyming couplet contains the volta or twist at the. Sonnet Glossary. 1 My sun: i.e. her eyes are not bright and shining. 3 dun : dull coloured, or greyish-brown. 4 wires: (gold) wires. Ornamental. William Shakespeare, “Sonnet ”. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; Coral is far more red, than her lips red: If snow be white, why then her breasts. Get an answer for 'In "Sonnet ", how does Shakespeare describe the lady he loves?' and find homework help for other Sonnet questions at eNotes.